The best game engine based on Rust-Lang

Hello,
I took a look at https://arewegameyet.rs/ecosystem/engines/. Which game engine is better and has a brighter future?
Please share your opinions.

Thank you.

Bevy is the most active one, but it is somewhat complicated. You can try macroquad or raylib for some quick and dirty game prototypes.

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For simplicity, ggez is also a very good option.
To be exact, it’s not a game engine like bevy, but a lower-level game "framework" or "library", merely providing the basic primitives for interfacing with OS and hardware, pretty much like SFML. (They didn’t write "game engine" on their website on purpose.)
macroquad and raylib are exactly that too (and thus I wouldn’t call them "game engines", granted I may be wrong in my definition).

An alternative to bevy, if you are looking for a feature-rich game engine, is fyrox. It even has its own game editor.

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Though many consider the bar between a game library and a game engine to be whether it has an editor!

Splitting the difference, you could call Bevy a framework, especially considering that it has its own ecosystem of plugins.

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At least, my understanding is that a game engine is also a game framework (there is an inversion of control in both cases), but a game framework is not necessarily a game engine, in that sense, no doubt that bevy is a game framework too.

Moving forward, from what I understand, there is no clear consensus on what constitutes an engine and what does not. All I can say is that the expectation for an engine is for it to be more comprehensive, streamlining the development even more, and thus tooling plays an important role as well, which circles back to what you said:

Though I think it’s still fair for bevy to call itself a game engine, because it’s undoubtedly more comprehensive than, say, ggez or macroquad, and providing tooling around its ecosystem is also a long-term goal of bevy.

Well, that was some bikeshedding :stuck_out_tongue:

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Yeah, pretty much agree on all points! There's some libraries (other examples might be Tokio or Tauri) where just calling them a library seems insufficient, but there's not necessarily inversion of control (depending on your definition)

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It basically comes down to what type of "game" you are trying to create.
Is it "first person shooter" style?
Card game?
"space invaders / pacman" style?
Is it a non graphical, no text output game...maybe just sound?

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There's also the Comfy engine which was announced relatively recently:

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Hello,
Thank you so much for your reply.
I had heard of Fyrox and I guess it would be hard to choose between Bevy and Fyrox. Which one is better in terms of features and development speed?

Hello,
Thank you so much for your reply.
Maybe I'm expecting too much, but is it possible to make a game like Call of Duty or something like that with the current Rust-Lang game engines?

Hello to all,
Out of the current Rust-Lang engines, is there anything on par with Unity or Godot?

Thank you.

Bevy has a much bigger community with many major contributors. Because to that, it is moving forward faster than any other Rust game engine (to my knowledge), and even though it is actually younger than Fyrox, it doesn’t compare unfavorably to it in term of features (disclaimer: I didn’t check all the features in details). However, in my opinion Fyrox offers a much more cohesive and straightforward experience than Bevy which requires you to use plugins for many tasks. And let’s not forget its editor, great when working on 3D scenes. Ultimately, both are moving at a very decent speed, and both have nice things to offer while differing in their approach. At this point, you should try both and see for yourself where your preference goes.

It’s hard to answer this because I have to interpret what you mean by "making a game like Call of Duty".
I believe it’s possible to build something similar, yes. However, if you want to "easily" make something really really close to Call of Duty, then, in practice, no, you can’t. There are many advanced features missing in engines like Fyrox and Bevy that even the studios behind these games would have to rebuild many components from scratch if they wanted to stick to pure Rust. But I’m not sure it’s very fair, because such games are using their own engine (e.g.: IW engine) or, at best, are tweaking extensively an existing one like Unreal Engine, so I don’t think they would actually use Fyrox or Bevy anyway, even if they used Rust. Even with a big team of many developers, it’s hard to imagine they would build the next AAA Call of Duty-like game with Fyrox or Bevy, even by tweaking the engine, given those are still maturing, far behind the competition. (And I’m kind of putting aside the fact that there is no game engine for all purposes in the first place, that’s why there are so many custom game engines among AAA games.)

No, nothing in Rust is on par with Unity or Godot as of today.

For building smaller games though, the ecosystem is already quite nice. (Granted you won’t find something like the Unity asset store.)

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Somewhere on the bevyengine site they suggest using godot but with the rust bindings crate GitHub - godot-rust/gdext: Rust bindings for Godot 4 if you want to use rust but with an established game engine with mature UI editor etc.

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I recently came across this video covering Comfy engine. I’ve not tried it, so can’t speak to any of the claims, but it looks promising: https://youtu.be/1w9f2-pyHtc?si=Nxbfl-2uJZlWde9X

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Hello,
Thank you so much for your reply.
This is only for making 2D games! In which forum can I find people who have worked with these game engines?

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