Which is the simplest IDE?


#1

Hi

what is the simplest rust IDE to setup
free would be very good too

i need something as simple as
install, write code, click button, see results in terminal window

i am aware of the following links, but both the of them seem a bit outdates
https://forge.rust-lang.org/ides.html
https://areweideyet.com/

i can assume that the intellij plugin would be good enough and simple enough
but it seem to require clion which is not free

advice please


#2

I find it’s unnecessary to use a full blown IDE with Rust. It’s easy enough to just use a normal editor and then compile from the command-line. The compiler has really good error messages which eliminates a lot of the reasons I’ll usually want an IDE.

At work (Windows desktop) I use Visual Studio Code for editing then run cargo build and friends in PowerShell and it’s worked really well. On my normal laptop (Linux) I’ll either use vim or Visual Studio Code and then compile from the command-line.

Visual Studio Code also has a really good plugin called Rust (rls) which will give you code completion, red squiggly lines for syntax/type errors, and all that.


#3

rust plugin works with any JetBrains’s IDE,
so you can use free and open source community intellij idea for example with rust intellij plugin.

CLion has special feature - gdb support. But

it looks like debugger support is not requirement.


#4

thanks for the reply

and to confirm, i installed the plugin on pycharm community and it works and fit my simple need
and you were right, no need for visual debugging at the moment, i am just starting with rust
i think it will be a while before i need something like this


#5

Yeah. The best you can really do is using VS Code and it’s plugin. However, if you’re like me and hate electron programs, it’s not the best choice. I’ve found a simple sublime text or vim setup works just fine for most purposes. I would love to see a rust-specific IDE sometime, though.


#6

I’ve been using Rust for a couple years now and only ever needed to drop into a debugger twice… both times were when interfacing with C code. Whereas at work when I’m using other languages I’ll often reach for the debugger a dozen times a day.

Rust’s powerful type system prevents a good 90% of bugs (“if it compiles, it’s correct”), then having testing built right into cargo means you can find logic bugs very early on in the dev process.


#7

I absolutely hate IDEs and will try to avoid them in situations that will allow such cases. I’ve learned more about Rust’s cargo manager by invoking it straight from the command line just like I’ve learned more about build steps using make/cmake for C/C++.

I’ve used Atom and Sublime. You can install the Rust Enhanced package to Sublime and run your code straight from there if you like. The Rust Enhanced package will give warnings/errors before you even compile. Attached is an example (Errors/Warnings are intentional). As you see it can get very “busy” looking with all the warnings/errors. The output is also less verbose in Sublime. Therefore, I personally run cargo run from the command line and use Sublime purely for editing.