Survey: What discourages you from using a tool?


#1

There are many things that discourage people from using additional developer tools. I’m trying to gauge which tool independent things are disliked the most.


Manual setup required

(download, multiple installation steps)

  • Does not influence my decision to use the tool
  • Would use the tool, but open an issue
  • Would use if the tool is very important
  • Won’t use the tool at all

0 voters


Dependencies that must be manually installed

(e.g. requiring openssl to be installed)

  • Does not influence my decision to use the tool
  • Would use the tool, but open an issue
  • Would use if the tool is very important
  • Won’t use the tool at all

0 voters


First time configuration required

(e.g. clippy lint defaults clashing with your preference)

  • Does not influence my decision to use the tool
  • Would use the tool, but open an issue
  • Would use if the tool is very important
  • Won’t use the tool at all

0 voters


Frequent adjustments to configuration needed

(e.g. disabling clippy lints)

  • Does not influence my decision to use the tool
  • Would use the tool, but open an issue
  • Would use if the tool is very important
  • Won’t use the tool at all

0 voters


Frequent work needed to keep the tool working

(e.g. figuring out the exact nightly version needed for a tool)

  • Does not influence my decision to use the tool
  • Would use the tool, but open an issue
  • Would use if the tool is very important
  • Won’t use the tool at all

0 voters



#2

I love that in the Rust ecosystem Cargo has made a de-facto standard for project layout and configuration.

For example, In C I could never be bothered to make Debian packages for my tools, since that needed installation of a few tools, writing of config files, and copy & paste of a few commands I kept forgetting.

but in Rust I can run cargo deb, and that’s it. Zero configuration and it gets the job done. That’s sooo nice.


#3

I agree with @kornel . Of all of the things Rust does well, cargo and the fact I can actually reasonably integrate open source systems programming modules written by others, may end up being what makes Rust expand it’s reach in a meaningful way.

Every time I open up a CMake file in C/C++, I cringe because there’s really no standard layout so you need to create one for yourself, and surely it doesn’t really match anyone else’s.