Suggestions for becoming the best coder I can be

At this point, I feel like I can code just about anything in any language given patience and persistence. I have been a self-taught coder since age 8, so my brain very much thinks in terms of code. Coding even inspired me to write a book when I was 20 called "The Bridge", which became one of the top monthly 0.5% of papers read on academia.edu within a few days (https://thomaspbraun.com/TheBridge.pdf). It is philosophically linked to computation, but it discusses existential ontology, as well as proofs to transition to atheist mind to a more "spiritual" one, yet still with rigour. Anyways, I still feel like I'm lacking:

There is one-field that I feel like I'm lacking in:

Algorithms and Optimization

I have taken differential, integral, infinite sequences and series, and multidimensional calculus, as well as discrete math, number theory, and introduction to mathematical logic. I am currently learning linear algebra to understand matrices and transforms involving thereof.

If you were in my shoes, and wanted to learn everything there was to coding, how would you go about it? What should I "grok" in order to know how to write the most efficient and performant code available?

Thanks guys! I'm just looking to learn from those who are superior to me, and many of such people are here on the Rust forums!

I had been coding for over 30 years in languages such as assembler, Fortran, Pl/1, APL, and more. In spite of that, I didn't "understand" computing until a colleague gave me a copy of SICP. You can even watch a set of lectures if you learn better that way.

The elegance of Scheme and the beauty of lambda helped me understand the fundamentals without having to dig through the cruft of the languages I had been using.

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Wow, SICP is a Gold Mine. Thank you

Lambda Calculus is really the lowest-level thinking that is used to represent physical states as virtual states and_then into programs. I can't really see anything beneath that, except for maybe the propositional calculus that it uses (first order logic?).