Research on Rust gamified learning curves

Hi!

Sharing a research we have recently made with Impulse DAO on how developers utilize gamified platforms to learn Rust. We were interested in their motivations & issues they're facing interacting with them and overall problems they have with web3 Rust (there are quite a few). We were inspired by the overall growing attention of developers to Rust, and wanted to explore the gamified learning apporach specifically. The research is not yet finished, you can read about the ways to participate in the article.

Hope you enjoy the read!

Link - How Developers Gamify Rust Learning Curve — Impulse DAO

From the TL;DR:

  1. Rust is growing it’s popularity among developers;

I hope so and would expect as much.

  1. The main issue of learning web3 Rust is it’s different implementations;

WTF is "web3 Rust"?

I have been reading everything I can find about Rust for three years now and never heard of web3 Rust.

  1. Gamification helps to stay motivated and have fun on the journey of learning Rust;

Maybe. But I don't get the idea. Don't people just read the books, try some experiments and then get on with developing whatever they want/need in Rust? Typically I don't have time to mess with games.

Or is it that figuring how to make whatever I want/need in Rust is game enough for me?

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"gamification" is a bit problematic term imho, as it can mean/cover almost anything like:

  • doing a game as such on specific problem
  • give people coupons after shopping to drag them in next time again
  • challenge book reader by asking him obvious questions, making them feel good about themselves

...and many other things...

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Rust is quite popular in the cryptocurrency world (an early example is polka dot). Web3 is an idea of a Web based on concepts like blockchain. I can only guess that this the motivation of OP survey.

Yeah, what kind of "game"? That word covers everything from tic-tack-toe to fraud to prostitution etc.

But as the word "game" seems to have its origins around doing something for fun I guess finding a fun way for people to discover Rust is not a bad idea. But then what is fun for me may not be fun for others and vice-versa.

That’s one interpretation, yes.

Great point!

We've developed a game for developers. Where you can compete by creating WASM algorithms and fight against other characters in a PVP(Player-versus-Player) environment.

The implementation is fully open-source -

Is it something you'd consider as a "game" or even a "fun game"?

Is the game there that we have to read a ton of code and figure out what it is supposed to do?

fair! we're working on improving the UX but you can refer to Character / Berserk / Mage folders as algorithm examples.

Your character gets the message with the current state of the battle and replies based on the algorithm you created. It's a programmable auto battler game where players can customize the character's logic.

Screenshot 2024-01-20 at 14.22.17

Maybe slightly off-topic, but an excellent resource for "gamified" learning of Rust (or any of its supported programming languages) is https://open.kattis.com/ .

The game there is to solve programming exercises and collect score. You get one to ten points per problem (by difficulty). And for the problems that is complex enough that the solutions takes nonzero time (when rounded to .01 seconds) you can try to create the fastests solution (which of course is especially fun when using Rust to beat a non-rust solution). :cowboy_hat_face:

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